Category Archives: Film

Film and movie criticism, news and views at Sketchy Details

The Lego Movie Footer

The Lego Movie Blu-ray Giveaway

Ladies and gentleman, boys and girls, geeks of all ages, I bring you the official Everything is Awesome The Lego Movie Blu-ray Giveaway at Sketchy Details. That’s right. Sketchy Details has partnered with the WB through PartnersHub to run a contest. The Lego Movie is still at the top of my best films of 2014 list so far for being so gosh darn funny, smart, and adorable. Now you have a chance to win your own copy of the shiny new Blu-ray that just came out this past Tuesday.

It’s running like The Purge giveaway last summer. Leave a comment (using Disqus) below to enter. Or tweet @robertjgannon with the hashtag #TheLegoMovie to enter. Or leave a comment on the Sketchy Details Facebook page that will clearly state “Enter The Lego Movie Blu-ray Giveaway” as the title. That’s it. You can do one, two, or all three.

You have until Wednesday, June 25th to enter. I’ll put all the entries in a Random.org file and pull the winner. You must be in the United States or Canada to enter.

I’ve left the official app for the movie release below the jump. You get to make 6 second Lego movies that get uploaded to the official The Lego Movie YouTube page. It’s fun. Mine’s embedded at the bottom of the post.

Continue reading

Horror Thursday: The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh

Horror Thursday: The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh

One of my crutches in reviews is pointing out I’d rather watch something ambitious that fails than something safe that’s boring. Well, The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh is the epitome of that kind of film. I applaud its ambition. I love the style, the mood, and the refusal to follow the traditional standards of film. However, it doesn’t quite come together as the narrative film it’s trying to be. It’s art, is what it is.

Horror Thursday: The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh

Hellraiser Ranked

Ranking Hellraiser

As part of the 3rd Annual Cinefessions Summer Screams Challenge, I’ve spent the past two days watching all of the films in the Hellraiser franchise. I’ve been obsessed with this series since seeing the trailers for Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth when I was seven years old and have only grown to love the universe and Clive Barker’s expanded works since.

However, because I so disliked Hellraiser III, I never really paid attention to the six subsequent sequels released straight to video. I’ve seen bits and pieces of most of them, but not the whole way through while actually paying attention.

This time, I paid attention. Oh, goodness, how I paid attention.

Continue reading

Night of the Creeps Review (Film, 1986)

Night of the Creeps Review (Film, 1986)

In Night of the Creeps, the aliens have already landed and we were never meant to know. The one infected human, a frat boy, is cryogenically frozen in 1959 for study. However, a fraternity initiation prank in the 1980s goes horribly wrong when the two pledges assigned with snagging a dead body stumble upon the alien host in a lab. The slug-like parasites begin to multiply, entering hosts through the mouth and turning them into flesh-hungry zombies. Now only the two former pledges can fight against the alien invasion stalled decades before.

Writer/director Fred Dekker, best known for The Monster Squad, presents a funny and gory horror/sci-fi film. The murders are as disgusting as the jokes are hilarious. It is, at its core, a genre film about wise-cracking nerds just trying to get some action in college.

Continue reading

A Million Ways to Die in the West Review (Film, 2014)

A Million Ways to Die in the West Review (Film, 2014)

Living in the Wild West sucks. Just ask sheep herder Albert. He’s witnessed the daily death and destruction in his town of Old Stump and he just can’t take it anymore. No one else seems willing to settle any dispute with words, not gunfire, and backing out of the certain death in a pointless duel means his girlfriend, Louise, dumps him. Now a new young lady, Anna, has entered the town and she decides it’s about time that Albert chooses to live for himself. This, naturally, leads to another duel and an actual need for Albert to learn how to fire a gun and survive in the West.

A Million Ways to Die in the West is Seth MacFarlane’s second feature film and it’s not as strong as Ted. There’s no avoiding that discussion. The two films take a similar approach to comedy, but Ted is far more entertaining in its dissection of romantic comedy tropes than A Million Ways to Die in the West is in its skewering of Western tropes.

Continue reading

X-Men: Days of Future Past Review

X-Men: Days of Future Past Review (Film, 2014)

The first thing you need to know about X-Men: Days of Future Past is that it’s not actually the story you might know as “Days of Future Past.” In order to fit in with the framework established in First Class and the popularity of certain mutants, the time setting, key characters, and metaphors (and by metaphors, I mean what metaphors anymore?) have been altered significantly.

Get past that disappointment, and it turns out that Days of Future Past is the strongest X-Men entry yet.

Continue reading

Rigor Mortis Review

Rigor Mortis Review (Film, 2014)

Rigor Mortis is one of the most beautiful and emotional horror films I’ve encountered in many years. An actor moves into public housing in Hong Kong when his career begins to fail. He attempts to kill himself, but is saved by a Taoist exorcist who senses something is wrong in the long-haunted apartment 2442. The actor soon discovers that nothing is normal in his new home. Ghosts, zombies, and vampires roam the halls and coexist with the tenants. Everything is balanced until a generous older tenant loses her husband in a tragic accident and wants nothing more than to spend the rest of her life with him intact.

This Cantonese language horror from Hong Kong is not afraid of the darkness in the soul. Rigor Mortis is a sad film filled with sad characters and sad stories. These tenants, new and old, have been through more than their fair share of tragedy and nothing is held back.

Continue reading